Partnerships, Marketing

Apps4Av occasionally receives requests from hardware vendors seeking assistance with integration or for marketing related activities. This page offers general information to those who have made (or are planning) such a request.

First,

Welcome!

Apps4Av strives to integrate hardware that is (or could be) widely adopted to increase safety in the cockpit. We also recognize that users and vendors both benefit from a well integrated user experience.

However, the core Apps4Av developer team remains small and 100% volunteer. We develop in our free time and receive no tangible compensation. Thus, we prioritize feature requests based on our own personal interests, the requests of our users, and the best interests of Avare (to ensure it remains a strong and maintainable app).

Hardware Integration


Our developer team will consider your request and, if found to be beneficial and practical, add it to our integration plan. We ask for your active assistance in integration. Here are ways you can help (ordered by our preference):

  1. Donate sample hardware to Apps4Av. It is difficult to ensure compatibility without access to the hardware. We suggest a donation of at least 1 (and up to 4) “devices” for distribution to our core developers. Here is how it will be used:

    • For initial development by those skilled in hardware integration.

    • For distribution to the core development team for longer-term compatibility testing.

    • We generally retain and continue testing donated hardware for a minimum of two years.

    • When it reaches end-of-life or end-of-support, it may be raffled to raise funds or given as a thank you to long term supporters (i.e., those who have provided donations or other support)

    • We generally do not sell hardware that has been donated to us. However, we may do so after the minimum retention period. Proceeds will be used as if it were a monetary donation.

    • We may return it to you, if requested in advance. (Please make it clear that the equipment is on loan!) We do not guarantee its safe return but will treat your hardware with respect. (FYI, Loaned hardware generally does not attract as much developer interest as fully donated hardware.)

  2. We accept monetary donations supporting our servers and other costs.

  3. We also accept new hardware donations for use in joint marketing or fund raising. For example, we may raffle the new hardware to our user base or our list of recent donors.

We will not accept hardware donations unless we plan to integrate the hardware. However, we make no warranties or guarantees respecting the timing or success of such integration. (Bottom line, we do the best we can do using our limited resources.)

If you profit because of Avare compatibility, we ask your help to ensure that we can afford to distribute our app for free! Please consider doing one (or all three) of the above.

Inquiries should be directed to our Support at apps4av@gmail.com

Thank you for your support.

Marketing and Use of Apps4Av Marks


As a non-profit group offering free apps, we don’t do much marketing. However, we will consider partnering for joint marketing activities on a case-by-case basis.

You may use our trademarks and service marks in your marketing only in a referential phrase. For example, “compatible with Avare”. You may not imply our endorsement of any product. We do not guarantee long-term support for any product. We reserve all rights afforded by copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property laws of the United States of America.

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized

Using the Avare External I/O Plugin app

NOTE: The app described in this 2013 post is no longer needed for most users and should not be installed unless required. The most common functions and features provided by this old Avare External I/O app are now integrated into recent versions of Avare and accessed via the I/O tab in Avare.

I/O tab with StratuX in Avare 8.0.7

See the StratuX post on this website for more info, and the Apps4Av Forum for the latest details. This article is intended for anyone who still does require the older Avare External I/O app. This article may also provide useful info for anyone having trouble with StratuX connection in recent Avare versions that use the new I/O tab.


 Avare External I/O app Quick Jump Menu

Bluetooth connection between Avare and an external GPS/ADSB receiver
WiFi connection between Avare and an external GPS/ADSB receiver
USB connection between Avare and an external GPS/ADSB receiver
Connecting to an Autopilot
Connecting to XPlane Flight Simulator
Connecting to FlightGear Flight Simulator (Windows)
Connecting to MS Flight Simulator

The add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app enables the Avare app to connect via Bluetooth, WiFi or USB with external devices like ADS-B and GPS receivers or aircraft autopilot equipment, and with external apps like flight simulators and gaming. Note that no plugin is required to use the GPS built into your Android device running the Avare app. Refinements and new features are added frequently, so please be sure you use the latest versions of the Avare External I/O Plugin and Avare apps, and that your Avare Database and charts are up to date.

Below are descriptions of how to use this Avare External I/O Plugin app with Avare.Once you’re familiar with the process, it’s pretty quick and easy. For the latest tips and details, see our Apps4Av Forum, where you are also invited to share any questions or discover your own helpful tips.  Thanks to user “avco” on our Forum for the earlier post there that formed the basis of this HowTo article.

↑  Go to Top  ↑

Bluetooth connection between Avare and an external GPS/ADSB receiver (e.g. Dual XGPS150,  XGPS170)

The add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app can use Bluetooth to connect the Avare app with external GPS units like the XGPS150, and with ADSB/GPS receivers like the XGPS170 for location, weather, and traffic.

1) When the external GPS / ADSB device is turned on and paired with the Android device, select the device name from the drop down list in the Avare External I/O Plugin app.

2) Press Connect. The device will start sending location updates, weather and traffic to Avare through the Avare External I/O Plugin app.

↑  Go to Top  ↑

 

WiFi connection between Avare and an external GPS/ADSB receiver (e.g. iLevil SW, Skyradar DX)

The add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app can use WiFi to connect Avare to ADS-B receivers like iLevil, and Skyradar DX for location, weather, and traffic.

1) When the external ADS-B device is turned on, it creates a WiFi network. Connect to that WiFi network from the Android device’s WiFi manager.

2) Enter the port number (43211 for iLevil, and Skyradar DX).

3) Click the checkbox next to the port text box.  The device will start sending location updates, weather, and traffic to Avare through the Avare External I/O Plugin app.

↑  Go to Top  ↑

 

USB connection between Avare and an external GPS/ADSB receiver (e.g. Skyradar DX)

The add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app can use USB-serial to connect Avare to ADS-B receivers like Skyradar DX for location, weather, and traffic.

1) Exit the IO module. Connect the USB serial port of the device to the Android device using a USB OTG cable (the cable shown below). A regular USB device cable may be required in addition to the OTG cable.

2) An Android pop up may appear, asking for permission to use the USB device with the IO module. Allow the permission, and the IO module will start up.

3) Go to the USB In tab, select the appropriate serial port parameters (230400,8,n,1 for the Skyradar DX), then press Connect.  The device will start sending location updates, weather, and traffic to Avare through the Avare External I/O Plugin app.

↑  Go to Top  ↑

Connecting to an Autopilot

The add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app sends RMC NMEA position updates to Autopilots connected to Bluetooth Serial connectors like the RN240.

1) With both devices on, select the correct Bluetooth Autopilot device from the drop down list on the Android device, then press Connect.

2) If the Bluetooth Serial device is active and paired with the Android device, the Avare External I/O Plugin app will connect with it. Position will be sent when Avare is running and GPS satellite updates are acquired.

↑  Go to Top  ↑

Connecting to XPlane Flight Simulator

Test setup used: Desktop PC, win 7 Pro 64. with XPlane 10.2.5.4 and Samsung Tablet 7″ or 10″ running Android Version 4.1.2

1) Make sure your Android device running Avare and your computer are on the same WiFi network.

2) Launch X-Plane, select Settings -> Net Connections, and then choose the “iPhone/iPad” tab.

3) At the bottom of the iPhone/iPad tab, check the box next to “Send data to ForeFlight Mobile.” Make sure that the IP address and port shown matches that shown on the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app, enter IP 192.168.0.6 and 49002 and check mark both boxes.

Make sure GPS is disabled in your Android device Settings.

Launch the Avare app, answer No to “GPS enable” and send Avare to the background (press Home button, do not Exit).

Launch the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app, and proceed to step 4 below.

4) Mark the checkbox on the XPlane line on the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app to start receiving position from XPlane.

5) Send the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app to background (Home key, do not Exit).

6) Reactivate Avare (press the Avare icon or select Avare via your task switcher).

7) If a chart does not display in Avare go to “Options” (square button icon above “Map” in map mode), and toggle “Navigate” to “Simulation.” Then click the “Find” icon, select your airport, go back to “Map”>”Options”  and toggle “Simulation”  back to “Navigate.” You should now have the chart displayed. If no joy repeat steps 5-7.

Use your XPlane to fly with Avare.

↑  Go to Top  ↑

Connecting to FlightGear Flight Simulator (Windows)

1) Install FlightGear as appropriate to your operating system (See http://www.flightgear.org)

2) Copy the XML text below and paste it into a new text document you create named “Avare_protocol.xml” in C:\Program Files\FlightGear\data\Protocol  (or wherever it’s installed on your system, $FG_ROOT\data\protocol).

3) Now run FlightGear using this command on one line:
fgfs.exe –generic=socket,out,2,192.168.1.124,49002,udp,Avare_protocol

Notes on the above command line:

  • Updates per second (2, try different values here to exercise Avare)
  • IP address to send packets to (192.168.141, use the IP shown in the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app) port to send to (49002 is default, this must match with the port the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app is listening on)
  • Protcol (udp)
  • Protocol definition to use (the name of the file you copied earlier)

XML text to copy and paste into a new text file you create. It is important that you create the file using a text editor app like Notepad, or if you use a word processor app you must SaveAs text file (to remove all formatting codes such as the italics in the text below). The file must be named Avare_protocol.xml as described above. XML text file contents:

<?xml version=”1.0″?>
<PropertyList>
<generic>
<output>
<line_separator>newline</line_separator>
<var_separator>,</var_separator>
<chunk>
<name>Header</name>
<format>XGPS</format>
<node></node>
</chunk>
<chunk>
<node>/position/longitude-deg</node>
<name>longitude</name>
<type>float</type>
<format>%03.4f</format>
</chunk>

<chunk>
<node>/position/latitude-deg</node>
<name>Latitude</name>
<type>float</type>
<format>%03.4f</format>
</chunk>
<chunk>
<node>/position/altitude-ft</node>
<name>Altitude in meters MSL</name>
<type>float</type>
<format>%05.4f</format>
<factor>0.3048</factor>
</chunk>

<chunk>
<node>/orientation/heading-deg</node>
<name>Track-along-ground from true north</name>
<type>float</type>
<format>%03.3f</format>
</chunk>
<chunk>
<node>velocities/groundspeed-kt</node>
<name>Groundspeed in meters/sec</name>
<type>float</type>
<format>%03.3f</format>
<factor>0.514444</factor>
</chunk>

</output>
</generic>
</PropertyList>

↑  Go to Top  ↑

Connecting to MS Flight Simulator

Test setup used: Desktop PC, win 7 Pro 64, with “MS FSX Gold”  with “XConn”  Ver. 0.5 and Samsung Tablet 7″ or 10″ running Android Version 4.1.2. See our Forum if you’re interested in the latest on attempts to connect with older versions of MSFS.

Note:  “XConn” by Ubi Sumus, Must be installed and used to output NMEA to LAN port. To locate, search for “ms fsx nmea output” on the Internet.

In “XConn”  enter the IP 192.168.0.6 and the 49002 in “Output” selection.  We changed the Baud rate to 4800 in the “xConn.cfg” file but that step may not be needed.

1) Make sure your Avare device and computer are on the same WIFI network.

2) Start XConn and verify IP 192.168.0.6 and 49002. Note that if this entire process fails in the end, one thing you could try is reading the XConn instructions related to “Window mode-Alt+Enter and start XConn” and reverse steps 1 & 2 here.

3) Start FSX.

Make sure GPS is disabled in your device Settings.

Start Avare, answer No to “GPS enable” and send it to background (press Home key, do not exit).

Start the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app.

4) Check the checkbox on the FSX line on the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app to start receiving position from FSX.

5) Send the add-on Avare External I/O Plugin app to background (Home key, do not exit).

6) Reactivate the Avare app (press icon or use your task switcher).

7) If Chart does not display in Avare go to “Options”, (icon above “Map”, in map mode only, and toggle “Navigate” to “Simulation”, click “Find” icon >click on your airport, go back to “Map”>”Options”,  and disable “Simulation”  / enable “Navigate”, you should have the Chart. If no joy repeat steps 5-7.

Go to your FSX, and fly Avare.
↑  Go to Top  ↑

Posted in Uncategorized

Avare Adds AddOns

The popular Avare app now has new free AddOns released on the Play Store, to provide capabilities beyond those built into the base app.

First is the new free AddOn for interfacing external GPS and ADS-B receivers to your Android device in Avare. This is the start of a giant leap in Avare capabilities as the Apps4Av team begins its second year of providing free and open source Android apps for aviators.

Our second free AddOn is for connecting Avare to the XPlane application. With this AddOn the XPlane application can send location data to Avare, which allows seeing XPlane’s plane location, speed, heading, and altitude on Avare. To connect with XPlane, use Xplane’s Net Connections Menu to provide the IP address, and match the UDP port of your Android device running the Avare AddOn (the default port is 49000).

As with all the Apps4Av projects, our team members welcome your feedback and suggestions on our Forum (link at the top of the right column of this page).

Posted in Uncategorized

Adding Airport Data

You may have noticed that we’re actively working on adding new charts to Avare. Recently we added topo charts for Canada, and are looking for volunteers to help with expanding that effort and adding other countries. Since we want to keep Avare completely free, we’re only adding maps that are free such as the Canadian topo maps we found online, and maps derived from OpenStreetMaps.

Of course, aviators also need airport data and other info, so we’re also seeking free sources and volunteers for that. We’re about to add more data of this kind for Canada, to a future release of Avare. Such free data is often incomplete or may even have errors, so we strongly encourage our users to help with the global efforts by aviators that are making accurate data available to everyone at no cost. So far, the FAA is providing official and accurate data and charts to us at no charge so all U.S. materials in Avare are sourced from the FAA.

For anyone interested in helping us add and correct maps and data for other countries, here is the format information:

LocationID Text,ARPLatitude float,ARPLongitude float,Type Text,FacilityName
Text,Use Text,FSSPhone Text,Manager Text,ManagerPhone Text,ARPElevation
Text,MagneticVariation Text,TrafficPatternAltitude Text,FuelTypes
Text,Customs Text,Beacon Text,LightSchedule Text,SegCircle Text,ATCT
Text,UNICOMFrequencies Text,CTAFFrequency Text,NonCommercialLandingFee Text

For example for SBA
SBA,34.4261944444444,-119.8415,AIRPORT,SANTA BARBARA
MUNI,PU,1-800-WX-BRIEF,KAREN
RAMSDELL,805-967-7111,13.4,14E,,100LLA,NY,CG,SEE RMK,Y,Y,122.950,119.700,N

Airport runways table is (one entry per table):
LocationID Text,Length Text,Width Text,Surface Text,LEIdent Text,HEIdent
Text,LELatitude Text,HELatitude Text,LELongitude Text,HELongitude
Text,LEElevation Text,HEElevation Text,LEHeadingT Text,HEHeading Text,LEDT
Text,HEDT Text,LELights Text,HELights Text,LEILS Text,HEILS Text,LEVGSI
Text,HEVGSI Text,LEPattern Text, HEPattern Text

For example for SBA
SBA,6052,150,ASPH-G,07,25,34.4274977777778,34.4279164166667,-119.854640805556,-119.834578111111,11.4,12.0,088,268,,,MALSR,,ILS/DME,,,P4L,Y,N
SBA,4178,75,ASPH-G,15L,33R,34.4307793888889,34.4196555833333,-119.840368194444,-119.836940027778,11.0,11.3,165,345,217,,,,,,,,N,Y
SBA,4184,100,ASPH-G,15R,33L,34.4305392777778,34.4194004722222,-119.841536166667,-119.838100777778,11.0,10.7,165,345,,,,,,,,,N,Y

Airport frequency table is (also contains tower remarks):
LocationID Text,Type Text, Freq Text

For example for SBA
SBA,LCL/P,119.7
SBA,EMERG,121.5
SBA,GND/P,121.7
SBA,ATIS,132.65
SBA,CD/P,132.9
SBA,EMERG,243.0
SBA,LCL/P,254.35
SBA,Remark,APCH/DEP SVC PRVDD BY LOS ANGELES ARTCC ON FREQS 119.05/269.5
(SANTA BARBARA RCAG) WHEN APCH CTL CLSD.

Navigational aid table is:
LocationID Text,ARPLatitude float,ARPLongitude float,Type Text,FacilityName
Text

For example for LAX
LAX,33.9331438888889,-118.432006388889,VORTAC,LOS ANGELES 113.60
LAX,33.7458508333333,-118.336183055556,VOT,SAN PEDRO HILL 113.90
Posted in Uncategorized

Big News – Forum

We have launched the new Apps4Av Forum, and are beginning to shift news and announcements to that more convenient medium. Ever since we began publishing Android apps for aviators, users have been eager to contact us with questions or requests and we’ve been eager to respond and to make announcements to our users.

On the Forum we hope to begin building an interactive community, where you can keep abreast of the latest developments. You can also ask questions, help with solutions, or share tips with other users. The Forum can also serve as a place to share your requests for changes or new features.

Please help us, by joining and participating in the Forum. Even by just subscribing to email updates, you’ll gain from knowing about any problems, fixes or updates. You’ll also benefit from tips and tricks offered by other users. If you post questions, requests, problems, solutions, feedback, or anything you’ve learned that might help other users, you’ll benefit by helping us to grow the user base. An active Forum can increase the Donations that enable us to keep all our apps free, and save us time that can go into adding new features.

Posted in Uncategorized

PIREP – Flying Avare

I have just flown Avare 3.6.8 to Freeport Bahamas and it was a fabulous resource. I loaded all charts & A/FD into Avare (amazing it’s all free!) on a Nexus 7. I all but ignored the panel GNS430 with 2010 world Jep, and my trusty old Lowrance 1000 with really old Jep. Those had a few minor strengths and were reassuring as backup, but Avare was by far the most useful. The Nexus 7 cost half what my antique Lowrance did when I bought it on clearance at “end of life” several years ago, and has already paid for itself several times over in chart/EFB savings with Avare (yes, I donated and am still far ahead on costs).

It’s very useful having real FAA Sectionals, WACs, and TACs that are current. Especially in the Caribbean where you can spend half the cost of a Nexus 7 just on books and charts that you won’t need at all with Avare aboard.

Thank you Zubair for a great app that’s making flying safer and more affordable!

Posted in Uncategorized

About Donations

• How is my donation used?
Your donation is applied toward Avare’s continued improvement, and toward the internet fees we pay for providing charts and other FAA materials on our server. None of the Apps For Aviators volunteers receives any financial compensation from donations, and some of us have even donated both our time and money.

• Why does a Software only application need money for improvement?
FAA charts, databases, and plates must be pre-processed from 20 GB files by an old desktop PC into Avare’s much smaller files that can be easily downloaded and displayed on any Android device. In addition to our internet expenses your donation will help buy a faster PC so that we can produce better quality charts. Once donations have paid for a PC upgrade, we will apply future donations toward ADS-B receiver purchases to enable adding free in-flight traffic and weather capability for a variety of receivers. We also welcome temporary loans of ADS-B receivers, so that we can add them to the list supported by Avare.

• Are there any hidden costs to the application?
No. The application is totally free. However, we will probably be forced to pass along any fees the FAA may eventually decide to start charging everyone for FAA charts and other materials that are currently paid for by fuel taxes and other FAA revenue.

• Why does Apps4Av provide the application free?
Apps For Aviators is run by volunteers who like to fly and to write software code. The coding allows us to improve our programming skills, while making friends in the aviation and software communities. We like to hear your stories and ideas, and see your aircraft. By providing the application for free, we are joined by more volunteers, meet more people, learn more, and reduce everyone’s cost of flying safely.

• What happens if I do not donate?
The application, charts and other materials will probably continue to be provided free because other people will continue donating their time and money. Many pilots have been willing to share with all of us some of the money Avare saves them, and some pilots have even donated much larger amounts to help us and the entire aviation community.

• What happens if no one makes a donation?
We have been very pleased by all the support and encouragement of the aviation and software communities. If all donations were to stop, the Apps4Av team would probably continue donating our own time and funds to keep the project going for at least a little while and then find other exciting things to do.

Posted in Uncategorized